Page 91 - Microsoft Word - SD16-En-Fin

This is a SEO version of Microsoft Word - SD16-En-Fin. Click here to view full version

« Previous Page Table of Contents Next Page »

86 

body for this purpose was made possible as a result of General Assembly resolution 52/166, which extended the competence of the Administrative Tribunal to the staff of any international organization or entity established by treaty and participating in the United Nations common system of conditions of service, upon the terms to be set out in a special agreement concluded for that purpose. Such an agreement was concluded in 2003 by means of an exchange of letters between the Secretary‐General of the Authority and the Secretary‐General of the United Nations. Thus, one of the features of the Staff Regulations of the Authority is that, by virtue of regulation 11.2, the United Nations Administrative Tribunal is established as the final appellate body for the resolution of disputes between staff members and the Authority.  

5. On 24 December 2008, the General Assembly adopted resolution 63/253 on the administration of justice at the United Nations. This brought to a conclusion a process of reform of the internal system of administration of justice at the United Nations, which itself was borne largely out of recommendations made by a Redesign Panel on the United Nations system of administration of justice, a consultative body comprised of international experts in international administrative law. In essence, the Panel had recommended a revamping of the justice system, primarily in order to address perceived deficiencies of the existing system, in particular the lack of independence of the members of the different appeals bodies, transparency and professionalism, as well as excessively slow proceedings.  

6. One of the cornerstones of the new system of administration of justice at the United Nations is the abolition, with effect from 31 December 2009, of the joint appeals boards and the United Nations Administrative Tribunal and the establishment of two newly‐constituted tribunals, the United Nations Dispute Tribunal and the United Nations Appeals Tribunal. The latter replaces the United Nations Administrative Tribunal, the second‐level appeals body currently available for staff of the Authority. It is thus necessary to address the implications for the Authority of the changes that have been implemented in the United Nations.  

7. The new system of justice in the United Nations concerns only the United Nations and its separately administered programmes and funds. It does not automatically apply to the so‐called Article 14 entities, including the Authority. For this reason, the United Nations contacted the Authority and other Article 14 entities with a view to ascertaining in what manner those entities would wish to participate in the new system of justice. It provided them with two options: (1) to retain one level of judicial review by the United Nations Appeals Tribunal, acting essentially similarly to the former Administrative Tribunal; or (2) to accept the jurisdiction of both the United Nations Dispute Tribunal and the United Nations Appeals Tribunal and to participate fully in the new system.  

8. Staff members of the Authority currently have the right to appeal an adverse administrative decision or disciplinary measure to a Joint Appeals Board in accordance with staff rule 111.1. The filing of an appeal with the Board is predicated upon the timely submission of a request for review (administrative review) by the staff member. As constituted under chapter XI of the Staff Rules, the Joint Appeals Board is composed of a Chairman appointed by the Secretary‐General after consultation with the Staff Committee, members (currently three) appointed by the Secretary‐General and an equal number of members elected by the staff. Members of the Board are selected on the basis of their present or previous experience in the United Nations system or with the Authority. The Joint Appeals Board does not render binding decisions but issues opinions and recommendations which are submitted to the Secretary‐General for decision. The Secretary‐General may accept or reject the recommendation of the Board, and in case of an unfavourable decision, a staff member may lodge an appeal against the decision of the Secretary‐General to the United Nations Administrative Tribunal.  

9. In considering the available options, the single‐tier option was deemed preferable on the grounds that it is easy to implement, relatively cost‐efficient and fundamentally akin to the current system used by the Authority. To date, no actual experience as to the functioning of the new system can be drawn, and it appears inappropriate to commit the Authority in any way to a process whose validity and efficiency remain yet to be demonstrated. In addition, the administrative structures and organizational changes which would likely be necessary in order to accommodate a transposition of the new United Nations model to the Authority appear to be disproportionate given the Authority’s size and internal needs. For comparative purposes, in the year 2007, the Joint Appeals Boards in New York, Geneva, Vienna and Nairobi had a total combined number of 177 appeals filed with them. In contrast,

Page 91 - Microsoft Word - SD16-En-Fin

This is a SEO version of Microsoft Word - SD16-En-Fin. Click here to view full version

« Previous Page Table of Contents Next Page »